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Super Mario 3D World director lives by "Miyamoto's Teachings"

More like Miyo-Moses, am I right?

We've all heard about Shigeru Miyamoto's continued involvement in producing Nintendo games (and the tea tables metaphorically smashed in the process), but it's rarer to hear just how deep an effect he's had on newer directors within the company. In an interview with Famitsu - as translated by Siliconera - Super Mario 3D World director Koichi Hayashida revealed that he hasn't just taken guidance from the games legend - he's kept some pretty thorough notes.

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"About three years ago, I was instructed to be a lecturer for a game seminar," he explained, "and while I had the necessary know-how for developing games, I didn't know how to teach it [to others]... So that's when I decided that I should take points from Miyamoto's interviews and simply pass them along, and began collecting his quotes. That was about the year I was directing Super Mario 3D Land, and I also felt that it could be useful for my own work. After rearranging [the quotes], they became what's known as the 'Miyamoto's Teachings'."

The Teachings - which I'm assuming have now been chiselled into stone and placed in a lead-lined vault for future generations' benefit - weren't just useful for Hayashida's students, however - they directly contributed to the two games Hayashida's since directed: "It definitely makes it easier to find out what parts will be essential to the game's development," he revealed. "During the Nintendo 64 era, if there was a hardware with the Nintendo 3DS' stereoscopic 3D technology, and if Shigeru Miyamoto were to direct that game, 'what kind of Super Mario would he have made?' was the theme behind the making of Super Mario 3D Land".

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"I believe that Super Mario 64 was able to be what it was thanks to its effective use of the Nintendo 64's characteristics. So I figured that with the Nintendo 3DS and its characteristics of easily grasping depth perception-a Mario game that uses 3D stereoscopic vision to give us a good representation of 'space' would be perfect."

Best of all, the Teachings are now a fundamental part of Nintendo's development culture: "they're part of the criterion used for proposals from everyone, including myself." Next, we predict every desk in the company will have a small, tutting Miyamoto hologram installed. For morale.

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  1. alexjones94 Friday 28th Feb 2014 at 10:55

    While it's obvious Miyamoto's had an enormous impact on Nintendo, I sometimes feel as though living in his shadow might sometimes hamper the creative spirit of some of the younger directors. Even Aonuma, who's highly accomplished in his own right, shows an incredible regard for Miyamoto in interviews. That's perhaps justified, but it'd be nice to see some of these developers do their own thing, work their way - I think that's the way they'll replicate the magic of Miyamoto's N64 days, not by trying to reproduce the way he worked.

  2. garywood Friday 28th Feb 2014 at 12:47

    While it's obvious Miyamoto's had an enormous impact on Nintendo, I sometimes feel as though living in his shadow might sometimes hamper the creative spirit of some of the younger directors. Even Aonuma, who's highly accomplished in his own right, shows an incredible regard for Miyamoto in interviews. That's perhaps justified, but it'd be nice to see some of these developers do their own thing, work their way - I think that's the way they'll replicate the magic of Miyamoto's N64 days, not by trying to reproduce the way he worked.

    I imagine there are quite a few cultural differences that play a part in this kind of talk. You really wouldn't hear a westerner saying this sort of thing about their boss, no matter how much they admired them. We're more individualistic and being overly candit about how much you respect and admire someone just usually tends to mean someone will take advantage of you.

  3. DaleBiederbeck Friday 28th Feb 2014 at 20:28

    While it's obvious Miyamoto's had an enormous impact on Nintendo, I sometimes feel as though living in his shadow might sometimes hamper the creative spirit of some of the younger directors. Even Aonuma, who's highly accomplished in his own right, shows an incredible regard for Miyamoto in interviews. That's perhaps justified, but it'd be nice to see some of these developers do their own thing, work their way - I think that's the way they'll replicate the magic of Miyamoto's N64 days, not by trying to reproduce the way he worked.


    They have done their own things with their games and series, though. The man is a master of his craft, so it only makes sense that his proteges would take inspiration from him. It doesn't necessarily mean they're living in his shadow. After all, everyone gets inspiration from somewhere.

  4. Maxz Saturday 1st Mar 2014 at 00:17

    While it's obvious Miyamoto's had an enormous impact on Nintendo, I sometimes feel as though living in his shadow might sometimes hamper the creative spirit of some of the younger directors. Even Aonuma, who's highly accomplished in his own right, shows an incredible regard for Miyamoto in interviews. That's perhaps justified, but it'd be nice to see some of these developers do their own thing, work their way - I think that's the way they'll replicate the magic of Miyamoto's N64 days, not by trying to reproduce the way he worked.

    Despite the reactionary title, I think this article (http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2014- ... s-miyamoto) sums up your sentiment quite nicely.

    There's no doubting Miyamoto's credibility, but it shouldn't come at the expense of fostering new Miyamotos. The man's work should be challenged as much as it is revered, if Nintendo's going to stop 'refining' and start 'creating' again.

    I can't help look at the current Nintendo lineup without feeling that 'I've already everything to death, or there's a reason I haven't wanted to'*. Pokemon Y - although not Miyamoto related - was the first Pokemon game I haven't got to the end of. No matter how packed full of extras and swish graphic, the act of 'pressing flamethrower and winning' doesn't change a whole lot, and it still required thousands of times during a playthrough.

    Also, the more mainstream something becomes, the more it had to rely upon a 'dependable fanbase' for continued profits, rather than on ideas alone. This might not have much to do with Nintendo; after all, the Wii was a complete change of direction; but it does seem to be something happening to the industry in general. And a lot of other industries. People are getting the games they 'want'; and they all seem pretty stagnant, boring and unimaginative. Or maybe I've just grown more cynical, I don't know.

    *At this point someone should tell me to play The Wonderful 101, and I'll wish I had a Wii U, but not enough to buy one for that game.

  5. Kirby8 Sunday 2nd Mar 2014 at 03:49

    *At this point someone should tell me to play The Wonderful 101, and I'll wish I had a Wii U, but not enough to buy one for that game.

    HAHA! You can see right through us. Honestly though, it's a fantastic game and if you're looking for something creative, inventive, new and fresh...that's the way to go.

    Platinum, formerly Clover when they were part of Capcom, are one of the few companies that are doing something inventive and fresh. It's evident by the attitude of Kamiya. He creates, he moves on, creates something new, moves on. He doesn't stick around. They make sequels, sure, but the person who helped create it takes a step back and moves onto a new project. Their games are "hidden gem" games. Games that weren't talked about much, didn't sell amazingly, but are pure genus squeezed into a disc. Plus, they aren't afraid to make their games tough as crap, unlike a lot of companies now (Nintendo included, as much as I love them), who are making things more accessible and easier for everyone to grasp and doesn't get hard until literally just before the end, rather then ramping it gradually.

    Some of the titles they have made:
    Clover:
    Viewtiful Joe (2 sequels where Kamiya was no longer director like the first, but just writer)
    ?kami (which had a sequel ?kamiden with no involvement from Clover team, still great though)
    God Hand (by Shinji Mikami)

    Platinum:
    MadWorld (by Atsushi Inaba)
    Bayonetta (Kamiya, sequel he's only supervising)
    Metal Gear Rising (Inaba)
    The Wonderful 101 (Kamiya)

    When they were part of Capcom, they also played key roles in a lot of other games, such as Kamiya in Devil May Cry! These developers are absolutely amazing and their games are too! They have a real passion to keep making great games, each one being different and unique. And it's great we have such a company around. People NEED to support them. I've done my part and I love so many of their games, ?kami, VJ and sequels, W101 and Bayo! If you want something fresh, look no further.

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